Community Remedy

Community Remedy is a relatively new approach to holding offenders to account for low-level crimes and anti-social behaviour issues and gives their victims a greater say in how they are dealt with, without going to court. While not appropriate for every type of crime, it does provide an alternative to going through the traditional court system, which is not only stressful, but can take up a lot of time and taxpayers’ money. Victims are invited to participate in the justice process, make decisions on what happens to an offender and receive closure on the case to help them cope and recover from their experiences.

What is it?

Community Remedy is a process where an offender, who has committed a low-level offence (usually for the first-time) and who expresses regret for their actions, seeks to put right the harm they have caused. Victims are invited to participate in the process and make decisions on what happens to an offender which is proven to help them cope and recover from their experiences.

Who can use it?

  • Police officers
  • An investigating officer (which can include Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs) for some offences
  • A person authorised by a relevant prosecutor for conditional cautions or youth conditional cautions.

When can it be used?

A Community Remedy can be used if:

  • An officer has evidence that the person has engaged in anti-social behaviour or has committed an offence.
  • The person has admitted to the offence and has agreed to participate
  • There is enough evidence for court proceedings including a civil injunction or caution but a community resolution is most appropriate

What if the perpetrator fails to comply?

If the perpetrator of an offence fails to comply with the terms of the Community Remedy, they can face court action for the original crime.